Soft Pretzel Twists

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Hi everyone! Today is a special post- it’s actually my 100th recipe on the blog! 

I’m going savory for number 100 with these soft pretzel twists, and they’re super easy to make actually. Let’s just have a real moment here, where we all admit to ourselves that soft pretzels are one of God’s gifts to earth. Like what self-respecting carb-lover does NOT like soft pretzels?

It’s actually one of the easier bread types to make because it only has to rise once, which means there’s less chance to screw it up basically. It does, however, have the odd step of boiling the dough before baking it, but that’s what gives it that pillowy texture we all love. 

Here’s the idea; you make the dough, give it a bit to rise, until it doubles in size and looks about like this: 

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Then, divide your dough in half, in half again, and then into fourths. Roll into a rope, fold it in half and twist. Then tuck the ends into the loop so you end up with a twisted roll shape, like this: 

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Next, you’ll boil the dough twists in water mixed with baking soda for about 30 seconds. Place it on your baking sheet, brush on an egg wash, and sprinkle coarse salt and pepper over the tops: 

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Then bake ’em up! Here’s what they look like all pretty and golden: 

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Even if you haven’t been following Dough-eyed for too long, I hope you celebrate this 100th post with me, and bake up some pretzel twists. You can use them as slider buns, a twist on dinner rolls, or just with nacho cheese- the classic. 

Enjoy!

 

Soft Pretzel Twists

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ cups warm water (around 125 degrees)
  • 2 tbs. brown sugar
  • 1 pkg. active dry yeast
  • 6 tbs. melted butter
  • 2 ½ tsp. salt
  • 4 1/2 – 5 cups flour
  • 2 quarts water
  • ¼ cup baking soda (that’s right, a whole quarter cup!)
  • 1 egg beaten with a little water
  • Coarse salt and pepper for topping

Instructions

  • If you have a stand mixer, use the paddle attachment. If not, a hand mixer will work. In a large bowl, mix together warm water, brown sugar, yeast, and melted butter. Let stand for about five minutes.
  • In the meantime, mix together the salt, and 4 ½ cups flour
  • Add the flour mixture to the yeast mixture and combine until dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. The dough shouldn’t be too sticky, so use more flour if needed.
  • Knead the dough on a flat surface for about five minutes, and form into a ball. Grease a medium bowl with a small amount of oil. Toss the dough in the bowl, flipping to coat the top. Loosely cover with plastic wrap, and let the dough rise for 30 minutes to an hour, or until it has doubled in size.
  • Preheat your oven to 425 degrees. In a large pot, bring two quarts (eight cups) of water to a boil. Add the baking soda to the boiling water quickly and be careful because it might splatter!
  • Prepare two sheet pans with a non-stick silpat sheet.
  • Divide your dough in half, then in half again. Then, each of those halves should be divided into four.
  • Roll each small section into a rope. Then fold it in half, and twist, and finally, fold the ends of the twisted rope into the loop on the top. This should create a twisted roll shape.
  • Use a slotted spoon to boil and remove about four pieces at time, for about 30 seconds each. You can put the boiled pieces directly onto your prepared sheet pan.
  • Then, brush the pieces with your beaten egg mixture and immediately top with salt and pepper. Bake for about twelve to fifteen minutes, until golden brown!
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Fresh Bread and Pesto Garlic Butter

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Fresh baked bread is maybe the best thing you can do. Your whole house is going to smell AMAZING, I promise, and you can enjoy it with super yummy butters, like this garlic pesto version. 

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This is a high altitude recipe, so if you’re making this at sea level, you’ll want to decrease the liquid by about 1/4 cup, and let your dough rise for 15-20 minutes longer on each rise. 

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On another note, if you’ve ever tried to make bread at a high altitude, you’ve probably been unhappy with the results. In my case, I almost always ended up with a very dense, heavy, and overly chewy end product that was… not good basically. In high altitudes, the rising times are a huge factor, so pay close attention to each rise for your dough!

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Eating bread thats still warm from the oven is one of the better things in life, and this recipe is an easy one. Bake bread today. Tomorrow. And everyday. (JK, that’s just a dream of mine). 

I also made mine with a honey cinnamon butter, which is fantastic too!

Enjoy!

 

Fresh Bread and Pesto Garlic Butter

Ingredients

  • For the bread:
  • 4 1/2 tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water (100-110 degrees)
  • 2 tbs. sugar
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tbs. canola oil
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 5 cups (to 5 1/2 cups) bread flour
  • 2 tbs. milk
  • For the butter:
  • 2 sticks softened butter
  • 2 tbs pesto of your choice
  • 1 tbs. roasted garlic
  • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper

Instructions

  • For the bread:
  • Mix together the yeast, warm water, and sugar. Let this sit for 5 minutes until the yeast has bloomed.
  • Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, heat together the whole milk, water, canola oil, and salt until about 120 degrees.
  • Pour the milk mixture into a stand mixture, or a large bowl. Add in 4 cups of flour to start, and beat together until combined.
  • Add in the yeast mixture, and beat together for several minutes. You will have a lumpy, very wet mixture at this point.
  • Add in another 1/2 cup of flour, and beat together. Continue slowly adding flour until dough leaves the sides of the bowl, and is no longer sticky.
  • Then, pull the dough out onto a floured surface and gently knead in a little more flour until it's smooth.
  • Place the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise for 50-55 minutes for the first round.
  • After the first rise, punch down the dough, and knead on a floured surface once or twice. Place the dough back in the bowl, cover, and let it rise again for about 40-45 minutes this time.
  • Once the dough has risen a second time, pat the dough into a large rectangle, and roll it into a log. Pinch the seam closed, and then pull the dough into a ring, and pinch that seam closed
  • Place into a lightly greased tube pan and cover with plastic wrap. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees.
  • Let your dough rise again for a final 20 minutes while your oven preheats. Then, brush the top with milk.
  • Bake for 15 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 375 degrees. Continue baking for 30 minutes, or until golden. The inside temp of the bread should be 190-195 degrees.
  • Remove from the pan immediately and cool on a wire rack.
  • Enjoy!
  • For the butter:
  • Mix everything together with a hand mixer or stand mixer until the mixture is light and fluffy. Store in a small container or mason jar in the fridge!
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Cheddar Bacon Herb Biscuits

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Today we’re talking biscuits guys. 

For me, biscuits are up there on the list of comfort foods, and I’m kind of a carb-o-holic. Biscuits and gravy is maybe my favorite breakfast meal, and guys, can you imagine THESE biscuits under your gravy??

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This version is loaded with sharp cheddar cheese, thyme, rosemary, and bacon. Could there really be anything better? Don’t get me wrong, I love plain old classic biscuits, but these are crazy flavorful. I pulled them out of the oven and they barely lasted long enough for me to take pictures. 

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I used thyme and rosemary for mine, but you can really add any fresh herbs that you prefer in here. I also used traditional yellow cheddar cheese, mainly just for the color appeal, but if you’ve got white cheddar, that’ll taste just as amazing!

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The key with biscuits is to avoid over-working them. Just keep it gentle, and don’t worry about getting everything perfectly incorporated- that will make for a tough biscuit! 

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The cheese will caramelize a bit in the oven, and with some coarse sea salt on top, you can just eat these babies plain. I was going to serve them with some herb butter, but the herbs come out in a beautiful way already inside the biscuits, so it’s totally not needed. 

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Enjoy!

Cheddar Bacon Herb Biscuits

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour, pus more for rolling
  • 1 tbs. sugar
  • 3 tsp. baking powder
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper
  • 2 tsp. chopped fresh herbs
  • 1/2 cup shortening
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • 2-3 tbs. crumbled bacon
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • Milk and coarse sea salt to top

Instructions

  • Preheat your oven to 400 degrees, and line a cookie sheet with parchment or a non-stick sheet.
  • In a large bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, pepper and herbs.
  • With a pastry blender or your hands, cut in the shortening until mixture is crumbly.
  • Stir in the cheese and bacon. Stir in the buttermilk until just combined.
  • Turn out the dough onto a floured surface. Pat the dough into a square about 1/2 inch thick.
  • Cut out the dough into 10-12 square biscuits, and place onto your cookie sheet.
  • Brush the tops with milk and sprinkle coarse sea salt over the top.
  • Bake for 13-15 minutes, or until the biscuits are golden brown on top!
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Tomato Garlic Focaccia

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Savory | January 23, 2016 | By

Hey guys! Today I’m sharing the rare savory recipe. 

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You guys know I’m a baker, and I tend to gravitate towards desserts. That being said, I also cook and bake a lot of savory foods as well. There’s one more thing you should know- bread is my ultimate favorite food. 

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Breads tend to be a bit of struggle to bake at a high altitude, and I’ve got some great tips on getting it right, which you can find here

Now, on to the focaccia! Focaccia is a super easy bread to make, and it’s similar to pizza dough actually. I topped mine with thinly sliced tomatoes and chunks of roasted garlic. You can top yours any way you want- it’s even great with just some salt and pepper on top!

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The tomatoes on top will bake into the bread a bit, and they become super flavorful from being roasted into the bread. This is a great side-dish bread, but to be honest, I ate like an entire loaf by myself as a dinner one night. Listen, it’s got tomatoes, I think that makes it a whole meal. 

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I promise you’ll love this bread, and you’ll love the fact that you don’t have to do any rolling or shaping here. You just use your fingers to press it out onto your sheet pan, top it, and you’re good to go!

Enjoy!

Tomato Garlic Focaccia

Yield: 2 loaves

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup warm water (105-110 degrees)
  • 2 tbs. warm milk
  • 2 tsp. sugar
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons quick rise dry yeast
  • 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 tbs. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2-3 roma tomatoes, thinly sliced
  • 1 head of roasted garlic, chopped
  • Coarse sea salt and pepper

Instructions

  • Mix together your water, milk, sugar, and yeast and let bloom for 5-10 minutes in the bowl of a stand mixer
  • With the dough hook attachment, add in the flour, olive oil, and salt, and knead until dough comes together. Add more as needed- the dough should be slightly sticky.
  • Turn out onto a floured surface and knead a couple of times by hand.
  • Place in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Leave in a warm area to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  • Divide the dough in half, and place each piece on a oiled baking sheet. with a little bit of olive oil on top, use your fingers to spread them out until about 1/2 inch thick. The dough should be dimpled.
  • Cover and let rise for another twenty- thirty minutes, until the dough has risen again by about a quarter.
  • Preheat your oven to 450 degrees. Spread the roasted garlic on top of each loaf, and then layer on your sliced tomatoes.
  • Sprinkle the tops with coarse sea salt and pepper.
  • Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown.
  • Enjoy!

Adapted from Cooking Channel TV

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High Altitude Yeast Breads

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Hi everyone! I’m back today with another high altitude post- this time we’re going over yeast breads. 

Yeast breads have probably been my biggest struggle at a high altitude. I’ve tried to make tons of different recipes, and not only have I struggled with yeast issues that any altitude has, but my breads have almost always turned out super dense. On the whole, the experience always kind of sucked for me- after all that waiting for the several rises, just to have to an overly chewy end result is a bummer. 

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Basically, getting your yeast to bloom correctly is half the battle. Get yourself a thermometer, because it just can’t be done without one. I’ve read a ton of recipes that say you can get the right temperature just by feel, but why risk it really, it’s not like yeast is free people! Go by the temperature recommendation on your package of yeast above all else, but typically for active dry yeast, you’ll want your liquid to be between 100 and 110 degrees. Trust me, you’ll know when you have it right- your mixture will bubble and bloom up very visibly!

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Now, on to the high altitude tips. When you’re above sea level, the most common problem is that you’re letting the dough over-proof, or over-rise. When you actually go to bake the bread, it will rise more in higher altitudes, and it will collapse, so to speak, and loose the light fluffiness because it’s gone past the rising point that we want.

That being said, you want to let your dough rise for less time than normal during each rise. Another way to look at it is that instead of letting the dough double in size, you’ll want it to rise to a bit less than double for the first two rounds of proofing, and even less than that for the final round. The dough will then continue to rise in the oven, and you’ll get that light, fluffy bread that you’re looking for.

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You can even put your dough in the refrigerator for the first rise, and leave it overnight. By chilling the dough, you’ll slow down the rising process, which can help to avoid over-proofing your dough. Just be sure to give it some time to come back to room temperature before you move on to your next rise.  

I’m sharing a great recipe for basic white bread today that works perfectly at a high altitude.  If you are at sea level, simply go for a full rise each round, letting the dough double in size completely. At sea level, you may also need less flour to get the dough to pull away from the sides of your bowl, so be sure to add the additional flour slowly!

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This is a great base bread recipe, and you can use to make dinner rolls, like I did, or you can even make a loaf of bread. You can also add different flavors if you’d like, and it’s a great way to start making bread from scratch!

Dinner Rolls

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 tsp. active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water (100-110 degrees)
  • 1 tbs. sugar
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 tbs. canola oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 1/2 cups (to 2 3/4 cups) bread flour
  • 2 tbs. milk
  • Salt and pepper for sprinkling.

Instructions

  • Mix together the yeast, warm water, and sugar. Let this sit for 5 minutes until the yeast has bloomed.
  • Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, heat together the whole milk, 1/2 cup of water, canola oil, and salt until about 120 degrees.
  • Pour the milk mixture into a stand mixture, or a large bowl. Add in 2 cups of flour to start, and beat together until combined.
  • Add in the yeast mixture, and beat together for several minutes. You will have a lumpy, very wet mixture at this point.
  • Add in another 1/2 cup of flour, and beat together. Continue slowly adding flour until dough leaves the sides of the bowl, and is no longer sticky.
  • Then, pull the dough out onto a floured surface and gently knead in a little more flour until it's smooth.
  • Place the dough into a lightly oiled bowl, and cover with plastic wrap. Let the dough rise for 50-55 minutes for the first round.
  • After the first rise, punch down the dough, and knead on a floured surface once or twice. Place the dough back in the bowl, cover, and let it rise again for about 40-45 minutes this time.
  • Once the dough has risen a second time, remove from your bowl, and shape the dough into about 2 tablespoon-size rolls.
  • Place into a lightly greased pan and cover with plastic wrap. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees.
  • Let your dough rise again for a final 20 minutes while your oven preheats. Then, brush the tops with milk, and sprinkle with a little salt and pepper.
  • Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until golden!
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